DEA Talks Cannabis in National Drug Threat Assessment

The Drug Enforcement Administration released its annual National Drug Threat Assessment today, and despite the changing times, there was plenty to do with cannabis.

The very first reference to cannabis in the report came in the executive summary a couple of pages in. The DEA noted that Mexico remains the most significant foreign source for marijuana in the United States. In a take firmly cementing what advocates said in the years leading up to marijuana legalization, the DEA notes transnational drug organizations that previously made bank off the sale of weed have largely been supplanted by domestically produced marijuana.

Mexico remains the most significant foreign source for marijuana in the United States. Customs and Border Patrol seized nearly 249,000 kilograms of marijuana along the Southwest Border between mid-2019 to mid-2020.

As for weed on the streets of the U.S., there is plenty of it. Only four DEA Field Divisions – Atlanta, Caribbean, El Paso and New Jersey – indicated marijuana availability was moderate rather than high. But that still means weed was generally readily accessible. DEA’s Atlanta Field Division was the only division that reported marijuana was less available compared to the previous reporting period.

In what can only be seen as a positive, forensic drug testing labs used by law enforcement saw less pot in 2019 and the first half of 2020. There were 270,677 marijuana reports submitted. That’s a 21 percent decrease from the 344,382 reports…

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The Drug Enforcement Administration released its annual National Drug Threat Assessment today, and despite the changing times, there was plenty to do with cannabis.

The very first reference to cannabis in the report came in the executive summary a couple of pages in. The DEA noted that Mexico remains the most significant foreign source for marijuana in the United States. In a take firmly cementing what advocates said in the years leading up to marijuana legalization, the DEA notes transnational drug organizations that previously made bank off the sale of weed have largely been supplanted by domestically produced marijuana.

Mexico remains the most significant foreign source for marijuana in the United States. Customs and Border Patrol seized nearly 249,000 kilograms of marijuana along the Southwest Border between mid-2019 to mid-2020.

As for weed on the streets of the U.S., there is plenty of it. Only four DEA Field Divisions – Atlanta, Caribbean, El Paso and New Jersey – indicated marijuana availability was moderate rather than high. But that still means weed was generally readily accessible. DEA’s Atlanta Field Division was the only division that reported marijuana was less available compared to the previous reporting period.

In what can only be seen as a positive, forensic drug testing labs used by law enforcement saw less pot in 2019 and the first half of 2020. There were 270,677 marijuana reports submitted. That’s a 21 percent decrease from the 344,382 reports…

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